2021 March - Ducks!

New arrivals! On the 26th of March, Norfolk Geese received its first batch of Aylesbury ducks. As a young chef, Joe’s goal is to help continue to keep Norfolk and Suffolk firmly on the food map, whilst carrying forward Norfolk Geese's ethos of fresh, top quality, local produce. An enterprise originally intended exclusively for restaurants, we are now opening up orders for duck to everyone, subject to availability, from 20th June 2021.

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2021 - 3rd Generation Takeover 

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2021 January - Future Focused

The Norfolk Geese website update was about 7 years overdue (and Eddie has lost about 80% more hair compared to the last pictures...). 2020 was a dramatic year, effecting every aspect of life - and the British Goose industry was not immune to this. We have had to adapt to both a year of COVID implications, Avian flu and the effects of Brexit, as well as acknowledging to the new consumer demands and developments within the British Goose industry itself. 

 

It was a hard decision, and not one that was completely in our control but in 2021 we have developed Norfolk Geese away from gosling hatching into a business focused on egg production and Christmas birds. Next season (2022) we are hoping to be able to resume supplying goslings - watch this space.

2014 -'Full English' - with our goose eggs

A 'Full English' at the Parlour Restaurant in north London wouldn't be complete without a goose egg.

"We do a 'no subs' Parlour Full English - normally with beans in a little glass jar - but we tried putting them in the hollowed-out egg shell and fried the goose egg," recalls proprietor Jess Dunford Wood.

"We did 45 of them on a wet Wednesday night. I do love goose eggs - rich, familiar yet unusual and surprising."

The goose eggs were supplied by Norfolk Geese who describe the demand this year as 'unbelievable'.

You can vist the Parlor at 5 Regent Street, Kensal Green or on www.parlourkensal.com www.parlourkensal.com

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Buckinghamshire goose producer David Bruce is this year’s recipient of the John Adlard Memorial Award for newcomers to the field.

He began producing geese this year after his customers began asking for geese as well as turkeys for Christmas from Collings Hanger Farm, Prestwood, near Great Missenden.

The award is made annual to commemorate John Adlard, founder of the modern goose revival and chairman of British Goose Producers for 22 years. It was presented to Mr Bruce by Eddie Hegarty, BGP chairman, during its annual goose walk and meeting at Herons Farm, Coggeshall, Essex.

“Through his association with premium turkeys, David Bruce is aware of the high standards customers are expecting from geese and we’re delighted to help get him started,” said Mr Hegarty.

The award, which includes a donation of goslings and specialist support through the first year, is made annually to encourage new goose producers.

Mr Bruce, who is also involved in a milk delivery business based at the farm, has been producing KellyBronze turkeys for the last eight years and sells all 300 in the farm shop. or many years he reared game birds and ducks — and so has found it an easy transition into geese.

The goose walk, attended by some 60 BGP members from across the country and Ireland, was hosted by Howard and Jane Blackwell who rear almost 2000 geese for Christmas along with turkeys and large table chickens. Many are sold through farm shop which on the eve of the event gained the top award for Essex from shops from Essex Life magazine.

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2011 - Goose eggs: Award for newcomer to goose production

2017 - When Norfolk Geese won the Countryfile challenge

The village green at Banham, near Attleborough, became the scene for a recreation of the bygone days when thousands of birds were walked to London on foot so they arrived fresh for the capital’s poultry markets.

On 6 December 2017 Adam Henson of Countryfile challenged Ellie Harrison to a race with a difference, her flock of geese racing against his flock of turkeys.

The BBC crew visited goose producer Eddie Hegarty's farm in Pulham Market and James Graham's farm of Peele’s Norfolk Black Turkeys where they choose 12 birds from each flock to take up the challenge.

Adam and Ellie transported their geese and turkeys to Banham and stopped just short of the village and then drove their flocks by foot to the village green which was the finishing post.

Ellie and Eddie arrived quite a while before Adam appeared and so were declared the winners of the race.

The programme was aired on the Countryfile Christmas Special programme on 24th December 2017. - Article from the British Poultry Council

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Goose eggs: ‘Can’t keep up with demand 

One of the largest suppliers of goose eggs is struggling to keep up with demand as consumers’ appetite for niche products continues to grow.

Norfolk Geese is experiencing unprecedented demand for eggs from farm shops and other retailers as well as individual consumers.

“We’ve never seen this level of orders,” says joint proprietor Eddie Hegarty, also chairman of British Goose Producers. “We used to sell eggs mainly for decorating, but the demand now is for eating them. We‘re dealing with orders from a dozen upwards.”

The eggs are packed in wood shavings in a cardboard box with ‘Fragile – eggs’ marked on the outside. “We hardly ever hear of any eggs being harmed in transit,” he adds.

Mr Hegarty and his family themselves enjoy goose eggs in omelettes, cake recipes and his speciality Yorkshire pudding. ‘One cup of flour, one cup of milk and one goose egg’ is his recipe …. which translates to around 50 grams of flour, seasoned and 150 ml of milk to fill a 12 x patty tin. Cook for 15/20 minutes.

He says BGP members around the country are also reporting buoyant sales with, for example, Howard Blackwell in Essex, trading as The Rare Meat Company experiencing a heavy demand.

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